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Released: 2024

Label: Epitaph

Pennsylvania-based rock band Mannequin Pussy isn’t one to mince words. Their latest offering, ‘I Got Heaven,’ is a testament to their strident lyricism and gut-wrenching emotive delivery. The album’s raw, unfiltered ethos is a sonic punch in the gut, a poetic rumble charting the contours of the human condition. You can’t escape the power in their lyricism, its introspection and sometimes stinging confrontation.

From the existential deconstruction in ‘I Don’t Know You’ to the potent vulnerability in ‘Split Me Open,’ Mannequin Pussy deftly navigates diverse thematic landscapes. They’re fearless in their venture into the turmoil of emotional discord, but equally poised when they sashay into quieter narratives of self-discovery. In this unpretentious collage of words and sounds, it’s the brutal honesty that shines through, packaged neatly within Marisa Dabice’s raw vocals and the odd sweet moments of harmonic relief.

Whether it’s exploring the pangs of yearning in ‘Aching’ or the distressing cacophony in ‘Loud Bark,’ Mannequin Pussy’s lyrical labyrinth is a complex, beautiful beast to unravel. ‘I Got Heaven’ is an album that resonates, that pierces, and most importantly, tells a story both harrowing and hopeful. So let’s get into it. From ‘I Got Heaven’ to ‘Split Me Open,’ here are the Delve into the Lyrics on ‘I Got Heaven’ album by ‘Mannequin Pussy.’

1 I Got Heaven

Mannequin Pussy’s explosive lyricism questions societal constructs and self-perception. One biting verse – “And what if Jesus himself ate my fucking snatch? / And what if I’m an angel? / Oh, what if I’m a bore? / And what if I was confident, would you just hate me more?” – interrogates religious norms, gender identity, and societal standards in a single swoop, blending sarcasm and cynicism with a quest for identity and acceptance. The repeated refrain, “I got heaven inside of me,” serves as a defiant and empowering declaration, redefining divinity by locating it within the self rather than in external, often patriarchal, institutions. The lyrics resonated with listeners grappling with their place in a complex and often judgmental world.

2 Loud Bark

The lyrics eloquently articulate a struggle for autonomy with lines like “Not a single motherfucker who has tried to lock me up / Could get the collar round my neck,” evoking an image of resistance against oppression. Simultaneously, the song is a celebration of the self, of audacity, asserting the lead vocalist’s indomitable spirit with captivating, unapologetic assertions such as “I’m a waste of a woman / But I taste like success.” Combining the will to challenge expectations with a desire for adulation, “I want to be a danger / I want to be adored,” this track creates an unyielding balance between vulnerability and ferocity, aptly symbolized by the recurring refrain, “I am a loud bark, deep bite.”

3 Nothing Like

Unfolding in a heart-wrenching narrative of yearning and self-revelation, it’s an exploration of need and codependence encased in the raw insulation of emo-punk. The lyrics are dense with vulnerability, lingering on the savoring details of the subject’s presence, from the shape to the taste. “I don’t want to deny / Oh I fear I can’t hide / That sometimes I want you,” the protagonist confesses, their voice curling around the wretched paradox of needing someone they’re also petrified of relying on too much. In a searing admission, they ask, “Oh what’s wrong with dreaming of burning this all down? If it’s what you want, I would give my life,” unapologetically acknowledging the dangerous lengths they would go for the object of their affection. The urgency and sheer force of emotion in “Nothing Like” is what positions Mannequin Pussy as pop-punk philosophers.

4 I Don’t Know You

There’s an undeniable tension between perception and reality, between what’s heard and what’s kept silent. The refrain, “I know a lot of things, but I don’t know you” hits home, crystallizing the track’s narrative of unrequited understanding. It’s a brutal honesty in the face of emotions that projects the band’s punk ethos into a poignant pop context. This layered exploration creates a lyrical terrain steeped in originality and candidness, a testament to the songwriting prowess of the Philly group.

5 Sometimes

It’s a journey of self-immolation, magnified by the introspective lyric, “I set myself ablaze / Sometimes”. The narrative oscillates between the collision of independence and desire for companionship, and the intense struggle of retaining one’s individuality within a shared existence. These themes are echoed through the poignant line, “Why’d you go and take your life and try to fit it into mine?”. “Sometimes” isn’t just a song; it’s a confession booth, revealing a raw, vulnerable side of human emotions that forces us to confront our own insecurities and compromises. It’s a pop-punk sermon on human connection that leaves the listener contemplating long after the last note has faded.

6 OK? OK! OK? OK!

The lyrics are an exploration of frustration and defiant self-assertion. It’s a trip through the battlefield of a fucked-up economy and personal turmoil. The lyric ‘Fuck a future, I don’t see it’ resonates deep, bluntly capturing the disillusionment of a generation. Equally poignant is the utterance, ‘You think this pussy’s easy? You’re gonna have to beg’. This is not just a line, it’s a battle cry for reclaiming respect and autonomy. The repeated ‘okay’ may come off as a flippant response to societal norms or expectations, but it belies a bite, fighting against the pressure of conforming. Hell, even the sarcastic laughing maintains that edge of audacious resistance in the face of adversity. Mannequin Pussy delivers a gut punch with this track, creating an anthem for those weary, but still ready to fight.

7 Softly

Lead singer Marisa Dabice’s raw vocals deliver a hard-hitting line, “What if one day I don’t want this anymore?” highlighting the impermanence and uncertainty of emotional attachment. The lyrics oscillate between eagerness to provide love and the fear of inevitable detachment, creating a haunting echo of hesitance and vulnerability. It’s a lyrical masterpiece that captures the band’s capacity to deliver gut-wrenching honesty and vivid imagery, encapsulating the listener in a whirlwind of emotional introspection.

8 Of Her

The repetitive chant of “Control” underscores the burdensome nature of the elusive power inherited. A particularly hard-hitting line like, “Serve me on a platter and then cut me”, adds another layer of tension, hinting at a struggle for identity and sovereignty. Laced with fierce introspection, the song captures a volatile relationship with self-worth and agency. Balancing between a cathartic confession and an introspective journey, the lyrical depth lets you feel the friction of stepping into one’s power. It’s a visceral musical siege wrestling with the cost of influence and dominance, ultimately questioning who is truly in control.

9 Aching

Frontwoman Marisa Dabice’s vocals convey a deep, almost primal craving for genuine, uninhibited expression. She’s not just asking for freedom, she’s demanding it: ‘I got to, I got to, I got to, I got to be free,’ she implores, the repetition reflecting an urgency that’s relentless and unapologetic. The lyrics encapsulate the battle between vulnerability and the desire for true intimacy, characterizing it as a gnawing hunger: ‘I was starving for some touch’. The song is an anthem of self-assertion, a testament to the struggle for emotional liberation. ‘Just tell me what you need,’ the refrain echoes repeatedly, keeping us grounded in the heart of the human condition—the need to be understood and cherished.

10 Split Me Open

With its cry for intimacy and yearning for personal space, it’s an invitation into the internal conflict of the vocalist. One line hits particularly hard: “My body’s a temple / It was built for you / To do all the things you dreamed you’d do.” This intimate confession is draped in longing and potential regret, exploring the dichotomy of love and desire. The repeated refrain “I’m asking for time / I’m begging for space” makes for a powerful internal tug-of-war, capturing an existential push-and-pull familiar to many. As the song closes, nothing changes, yet everything has – a poignant reminder of the struggle within oneself to balance love and individuality.

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